Placeholder text, please change

Bienvenue !

Use by permission copyright 1995
Licenses allows use of image Copy Right 1995
 
Une autre langue; un autre âme...
 
French Course Description:

          In 2013, South Carolina underwent a major change in how modern languages and classical languages are studied in South Carolina public schools. Focus shifted from a grammar-modeling approach to a student goal based learning model. In Chesterfield County schools, most students begin at the novice level, which means that they have had no prior knowledge of the language being studied (Spanish or French). Students progress through each level by demonstrating competencies in both communication (reading, writing and speaking) in the target language and awareness of the culture that drives that language.  

            The state requires that students do the following behaviors (non-negotiable): 1- Restrict reliance on English in spoken form, written form, and in listening formats 2- Speak aloud in Spanish or in French 3- Use appropriate body-language in order to communicate 4- Listen for understanding in Spanish or in French 5- Write using only Spanish or French 6- Read documents in Spanish or in French to acquire information then to interact with the information physically and mentally. 

 

Areas of Study:

            Students who take French courses at Cheraw High School use the language to explore a variety of professional and academic fields:

            ∞ Literature

            ∞ History

            ∞ Economics

            ∞ Mathematics (geometry and trigonometry)

            ∞ Earth Sciences: (ecology and geology)

            ∞ Geography

            ∞ Political science

French courses at Cheraw High School are quite rigorous. Traditionally, French students have set high expectations for their teacher. The teacher has set high expectations for the students. Lazy or unmotivated students do not tend to do well in these courses. Students are expected to read articles that are written in French on various topics within these fields of study. Students are taught how- then they are expected to write extensively in French. Students are taught how- then they are expected to ask and answer questions in French about various topics within these fields of study. Students are taught how- then they are expected to use algorithms in French, functions in French, techniques in French, logic in French, and technologies in French to investigate the Francophone world as well as to solve read-world problems.

 

 

                                              Ghent 2002